Classes

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11th Term March 25th, 2015
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IT542: Ethical Hacking and Network Defense
(4 Credits)

Professor
Dr. Matthew North

Course Description
An ethical hacker is a security expert who attacks a system on behalf of the system’s owners. This course focuses on discovering network vulnerabilities that a malicious hacker can exploit. The course explores penetration testing; foot printing and social engineering; scanning and enumeration; operating system weaknesses; and the methods used to hack Web servers and wireless networks. Students complete hands-on projects using state-of-art hacking tools and techniques.

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10th Term February 4th, 2015
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IT541: Computer and Network Security
(4 Credits)

Professor
Steven Bale, PhD, JD, CISSP, MCSE

Course Description
In today’s world, protection of data is serious business. This course explains the concepts and techniques involved in keeping computers and networks secure. The course examines fundamentals such as viruses, worms, and other malicious software; authentication and encryption security; file security and shared-resources; firewalls and border security; and physical and network topology security.

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9th Term December 16th, 2014
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IT590: Legal and Ethical Issues in IT (4 Credits)

Professor
Lennea Hall, JD, MSBA

Course Description
This course provides a detailed discussion of the legal and ethical issues associated with the information technology age. Topics covered in this course include: ethical theories related to information technology, protection of intellectual property, privacy, computer and network security, cyber crimes, and ethical behavior for working in the computer industry.

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8th Term November 5th, 2014
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IT560: Managing Technology in a Business Environment (4 Credits)

Professor
Stephen Beyer, Ph.D.

Course Description
Businesses are faced with many challenges when managing their information technology. Since information technology is continually evolving, businesses which stick with their current IT systems may be left behind. In this course, students identify innovative solutions to business problems. Specific topics include the analysis of cost and efficiency benefits found in emerging technologies, the legal and regulatory implications of various IT infrastructure strategies, and the complex process enterprises face in integrating new technology with existing infrastructure.

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7th Term September 17th, 2014
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IT540: Management of Information Security
(4 Credits)

Professor
Kenneth Flick, Ph.D.

Course Description
IT professionals must focus on a wide range of security-related issues and develop security systems that address constantly changing threats. This course takes the approach that security components and business functions work in tandem. Topics like asset identification, human factors, compliance with regulations, personnel security, risk assessment, and ethical considerations are covered, as well as computer and network security tools and methods.

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6th Term August 5th, 2014
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IT530: Computer Networks (4 Credits)

Professor
Thomas Watts, Ph.D.

Course Description
This course introduces data communications and networking technologies from the business perspective by heavily utilizing case studies and the decision-making process. Topics consist of network operating systems, local and wide area networks, and voice and wireless networks as well as security and the Internet. The focus will be on practical applications of these concepts including support issues, administration, and management.

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5th Term June 18th, 2014
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IT526: Database Design and Data Modeling
(4 Credits)

Professor
Jon Walter McKeeby, DSc, MBA

Course Description
This course introduces students to relational database design and SQL (Structured Query Language) used with relational databases. Students will be introduced to a history of database management covering hierarchical, network, relational and object oriented models with a focus on the relational model and its operators. Students will be presented with a methodology for relational database design using Entity Relationship Diagrams and normalization of data. Students will be introduced to a subset of SQL using IBM’s DB2 on the iSeries platform. An overview of the functions of the Database Management System (DBMS) and of a Database Administrator (DBA) will also be presented.

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4th Term May 7th, 2014
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IT525: Database Design and Data Modeling
(4 Credits)

Professor
Michael Collins, Ph.D.

Course Description
This course discusses the main tasks in designing a database and will use ERD Tools in this process. The course covers the fundamental design topics including: data modeling; entity-relationship diagrams; enhanced entity-relationship diagrams; top-down database design methodology the bottom-up database design methodology; functional dependencies; and the normalization process. The course will also introduce students to advanced topics of database management.

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3rd Term April 29th, 2014
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IT511: Information Systems Project Management
(4 Credits)

click to preview book

Professor
Chad McAllister, Ph.D.

Course Description
This course focuses on the key factors in effectively managing information systems projects. Students study project management techniques for information systems projects through detailed case studies and exercises. Students learn how to manage information systems projects through the use of the five project management process groups and Integrated with the nine project management knowledge areas. Approaches for information systems project management and examples relevant to information systems projects are used throughout the course.

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2nd Term March 18th, 2014
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IT510: Systems Analysis and Design
(4 Credits)

click to preview book

Professor
Desiree DePriest, Ph.D.

Course Description
This course provides an in-depth overview of system analysis and design methodologies. Students examine techniques to develop systems more efficiently using the system development life cycle (SDLC). Students use object-oriented approaches to develop information systems using the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

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1st Term December 1st, 2013
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IT500: Critical Concepts and Competencies for the IT Professional
(4 Credits)

click to preview book

Professor
Kristina Setzekorn, Ph.D.

Course Description
This course provides students with a foundation in the concepts and paradigms that shape information technology today. Students will distinguish between current competing ideologies to expand their technological knowledge and make informed business decisions. A focus will be placed on internet technologies, hardware and software components, and networked environments, as well as ethical and social issues in information technology. Students will also be introduced to the MSIT learning team model which will be built upon throughout the program.

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Final term, 14th Term September 18th, 2013
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LI499: Bachelor’s Capstone in Liberal Studies (5 Credits)

Senior Capstone

Professor
Debra Elliott

Course Description
Typically the curriculum of a Liberal Studies program strives to provide exposure to a variety of valued content areas to achieve balance in the the arts, humanities, sciences, literature, etc. In addition, during the course of study, students are expected to develop their intellectual critical thinking skills in analysis, logic, and evaluation as well as hone their communication and research skills. The Liberal Studies program derives its roots from the Classical Era where every free man was expected to develop intellectual abilities and enough general content knowledge in order to effectively participate in a democracy and contribute rational, informed opinions. While the goal of other programs of study may be to provide intensive specialization in technical, professional or vocational fields, the Liberal Studies program provides exposure to a range of content for the purpose of developing into a well-rounded individual. With his/her diverse background, the Liberal Studies graduate will be able to apply this understanding to a variety of fields, developing an appreciation for lifelong learning, an ability to utilize critical thinking, ethical reasoning, research, and communication skills to solve problems in a variety of contexts, all the while seeing the relevance and application of core content knowledge to solve problems and appreciate diversity.

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SS260: Gender & Society
(5 Credits)

Gender and Society

Professor
Brenda Beach

Course Description
This interdisciplinary course will explore the ways that the expectations of men and women in societies today have been shaped by history, culture, and globalization processes. We will examine how gender affects our perception of ourselves and the ways that we are viewed by society over the life course. This course will help students understand the roles and contributions of women and men in the arenas of family, work, politics, education, and the liberal arts.

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13th Term July 3rd, 2013

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SC435-03: Genetics
(6 Credits)

Genetics

Professor
Kirk Williams

Course Description
This course explores the molecular basis of genetics as applied to human health including developmental genetics, immunogenetics, and cancer genetics. Using case studies, students learn the role of dominant and recessive genes in various diseases and the importance of genetic counseling. In addition, students will discuss gene-mapping methodologies and ethical issues in the context of clinical genetics.

Chapters
Chapter 1: Introduction to Genetics
Chapter 2: Chromosomes and Cellular Respirations
Chapter 3: Basic Principles of Heredity
Chapter 4: Extensions and Modifications of the Basic Principles
Chapter 5: Linkage, Recombination, and Eukaryotic Gene Mapping
Chapter 6: Bacterial and Viral Genetic Systems
Chapter 7: Chromosome Variation
Chapter 8: DNA: The Chemical Nature of the Gene
Chapter 9: DNA Replication and Recombination
Chapter 10: From DNA to Proteins: Transcription and RNA Processing
Chapter 11: From DNA to Proteins: Translation
Chapter 12: Control of Gene Expression
Chapter 13: Gene Mutations, Transposable Elements, and DNA
Chapter 14: Molecular Genetic Analysis, Biotechnology, and Genomics
Chapter 15: Cancer Genetics
Chapter 16: Quantitative Genetics
Chapter 17: Population and Evolutionary Genetics

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SS368: Social Perspectives on Death and Dying (Honors)
(6 Credits)

Death and Dying

Professor
Zachary Funk

Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the cultural dimensions of death and dying. This topic affects each of us because of our own mortality and our relationships with others who die, whether close to us or complete strangers. The primary goals of the course are to help students deepen their understanding of the cultural dimensions of death and dying and to enable them to become a more effective provider of support.

Chapters
Prologue: The Horse on the Dining-Room Table.

Part One: LEARNING ABOUT DEATH, DYING, AND BEREAVEMENT.
1. Education About Death, Dying, and Bereavement.

Part Two: DEATH.
2. Changing Encounters with Death.
3. Changing Attitudes toward Death.
4. Death–Related Practices and the American Death System.
5. Cultural Differences and Death.

Part Three: DYING.
6. Coping with Dying.
7. Coping with Dying: How Individuals Can Help.
8. Coping with Dying: How Communities Can Help.

Part Four: BEREAVEMENT.
9. Coping with Loss and Grief. 10. Coping with Loss and Grief: How Individuals Can Help. 11. Coping with Loss and Grief: Funeral Practices and Other Ways Communities Can Help.

Part Five: DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVES.
12. Children.
13. Adolescents.
14. Adults.
15. The Elderly.

Part Six: LEGAL, CONCEPTUAL, AND MORAL ISSUES.
16. Legal Issues.
17. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.
18. Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Intentionally Ending a Human Life.
19. The Meaning of Place of Death in Life.

Part Seven: NEW CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES.
20. HIV Infection and AIDS.
Epilogue: Calendar Date Gives Mom Reason to Contemplate Life.

Appendix A: Selected Literature for Children: Annotated Descriptions.

– See more at: http://www.cengage.com/search/productOverview.do?N=0&Ntk=P_Isbn13&Ntt=9780495506461#TableofContents

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12th Term April 17th, 2013

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BU224-01: Microeconomics
(5 Credits)

Microeconomics

Professor
Tilahun Ayanou

Course Description
This course is an introduction to the principles of microeconomics, which introduces students to the study of the allocation of scarce resources by individual economic actors (consumers and firms) in a market economy. Students will examine the role of markets (supply and demand) in determining prices, consumer and household behavior, and the application of the cost function of a firm in different market structures to maximize profits. Particular attention will be given to integrating economic principles with the study of “real-world” problems.

Chapters
1 First Principles
2 Economic Models: Trade-offs and Trade
3 Supply and Demand
4 Consumer and Producer Surplus
5 Price Controls and Quotas: Meddling with Markets
6 Elasticity
7 Taxes
8 International Trade
9 Making Decisions
10 The Rational Consumer
11 Behind the Supply Curve: Inputs and Costs
12 Perfect Competition and the Supply Curve
13 Monopoly
14 Oligopoly
15 Monopolistic Competition and Product Differentiation
16 Externalities
17 Public Goods and Common Resources
18 The Economics of the Welfare State
19 Factor Markets and the Distribution of Income
20 Uncertainty, Risk, and Private Information

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PS380-01: Clinical Psychology Political Science
(6 Credits)

Clinical Psychology - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Sara Barnett

Course Description
This course explores the foundations of clinical psychology, including the history, practice and application of psychology in clinical settings. Students will examine ethical and legal considerations in counseling, the roles and responsibilities of therapist and client, clinical skills, diversity issues, and professional development and opportunities. Current topics related to clinical practice will also be covered.

Chapters
Clinical Psychology: Definition and Training
Evolution of Clinical Psychology
Current Controversies in Clinical Psychology
Cultural Issues in Clinical Psychology
Ethical Issues in Clinical Psychology
Conducting Research in Clinical Psychology
Diagnosis and Classification Issues
The Clinical Interview
Intellectual and Neuropsychological Assessment
Personality Assessment and Behavioral Assessment
General Issues in Psychotherapy
Psychodynamic Psychotherapy
Humanistic Psychotherapy
Behavioral Psychotherapy
Cognitive Psychotherapy
Group and Family Therapy
Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Health Psychology
Forensic Psychology

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11th Term January 30th, 2013

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PO101-01 Political Science
(5 Credits)

Political Science - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Scott Boykin

Course Description
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideas of Political Science in the areas of political theory, governmental institutions, political economy, and comparative politics. The course examines the unique interdisciplinary nature of Political Science among the social sciences. Particular emphasis is placed on the history of political thought and its influence on contemporary political ideologies; different types of political systems; and the roles of various political actors, both within those systems and in global context.

Chapters
PART I. THE BASES OF POLITICS
Chapter 1. Politics and Political Science
Chapter 2. Theories
Chapter 3. Ideologies
Chapter 4. States
Chapter 5. Constitutions
Chapter 6. Regimes

PART II. POLITICAL ATTITUDES
Chapter 7. Political Culture
Chapter 8. Public Opinion

PART III. POLITICAL INTERACTIONS
Chapter 9. Political Communication
Chapter 10. Interest Groups
Chapter 11. Parties
Chapter 12. Elections

PART IV. POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS
Chapter 13. Legislatures
Chapter 14. Executives and Bureaucracies
Chapter 15. Judiciaries

PART VI. WHAT POLITICAL SYSTEMS DO
Chapter 16. Political Economy
Chapter 17. Political Violence
Chapter 18. International Relations

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PS300-01 Research Methods
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(6 Credits)

Political Science - click to go to worth publishers

Professor
Kimberly Maring

Course Description
This course provides learners with a basic understanding of the scientific method and how it applies to the field of psychology. It addresses the research methods used in psychology and the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It also teaches learners when it is appropriate to use one method over the other and how to evaluate the accuracy of the conclusions of a study. Finally, it addresses the ethical issues related to conducting research in psychology.

Chapters
Part I. Foundations of Empirical Research
1. The Scientific Approach
2. Conceptual Foundations of Research
3. Basic Elements of Research
4. Ethics in Social Science Research

Part II. Design and Structure of Research
5. Research Designs: Experiments
6. Research Designs: Cross-Sectional and Quasi-Experimental Designs
7. Measurement
8. Sampling and Sampling Designs

Part III. Data Collection
9. Observational Methods
10. Survey Research
11. Questionnaire Construction
12. Qualitative Research
13. Secondary Data Analysis and Sources

Part IV. Data Processing and Analysis
14. Data Preparation and Analysis
15. The Univariate Distribution
16. Bivariate Analysis
17. Control, Elaboration, and Multivariate Analysis
18. Index Construction and Scaling Methods
19. Inferences

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10th Term November 7th, 2012
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SS360 01 American Women
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(5 Credits)

American Women - click to go to amazon.com American Women
click to see WWII Nurse booklet cover pic1 pic2 pic3 pic4 pic5 pic6 pic7 pic8

Professor
Jennifer Harrison

Course Description
This course examines how gender shapes the experience of women in their social, political, and professional roles. The exploration includes the impact of class, religion, race, and ethnicity on gender roles and expectations for women from colonial times through the present day. Additionally, students will explore the cultural influence of women throughout American history including contributions of women to philosophy, literature, and art. Throughout the course, students will investigate themes of continuity and change in the lives of American women.

Chapters
Unit 01 A New World for Women
Unit 02 Women in the West: American Migration
Unit 03 Suffrage and Emergence of the Women’s Movement
Unit 04 Labor and Immigration: Women’s Work and Immigrant Culture
Unit 05 Women and Activism: Public Life, Politics, and Change
Unit 06 A Modern Woman Emerging: Gender, Race, and Sexuality
Unit 07 Civil Rights: Gender, Race, and Sexuality Redefined
Unit 08 The Modern Woman and Social Change
Unit 09 Pop Culture: Women’s Voices
Unit 10 Moving Forward

Other Resources
http://www.nps.gov/history/-history/online_books/5views/5views5e.htm
http://www.pbs.org/itvs/alcatrazisnotanisland/alcatraz.html
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart9.html
http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/-progressiveera/africanamericanreform.html
http://www.unr.edu/nwhp/bios/women/winnemucca.htm
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/oct14.html
http://voices.cla.umn.edu/artistpages/hopkinsSarah.php
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthe-faceofmedicine/physicians/biography_253.html
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5794/
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshall-remain/the_films/episode_1_trailer
http://theautry.org/explore/exhibits/sod/
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/frontierhouse/-frontierlife/essay5.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/american-experience/films/triangle/player/
http://www.loc.gov/teachers/-classroommaterials/presentationsand-activities/presentations/immigration/-alt/italian6.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex-/chicago/peopleevents/p_addams.html
http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2011/nr11-79.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/-wilson/peopleevents/p_paul.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/pill/index.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDPm67rZ2Co
http://www.nps.gov/history/-history/online_books/5views/5views5e.htm
http://www.pbs.org/itvs/alcatrazisnotanisland/alcatraz.html
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart9.html
http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/-progressiveera/africanamericanreform.html

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9th Term August 22nd, 2012

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IT133-02: Software Applications
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(5 Credits)

software applications software applications

Professor
Risa Blair

Course Description
This course teaches students to use application software. Topics include an introduction to the Windows operating system and to Microsoft Office applications such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Students also learn how to apply the use of software applications within a profession.

Chapters
Unit 1: Introduction to Windows and File Management
Unit 2: Introduction to Microsoft Word 2010
Unit 3: Editing and formatting a document
Unit 4: Adding tables and graphics
Unit 5: Introduction to Excel
Unit 6: Exploring Formulas and Functions
Unit 7: Charts, Graphs, Pivot Tables
Unit 8: Introduction to PowerPoint 2010

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8th Term June 6th, 2012

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BU204-02: Macroeconomics
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(5 Credits)

Macroeconomics - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Rodolfo Biasca

Personal Website
http://www.biasca.biz

Course Description
This course is an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics. Students will analyze the purpose and functions of national income accounting, the components of Gross Domestic Product, the determinants of long run economic growth, and the causes and costs of inflation and unemployment. Students will be introduced to money, banking, and financial institutions. In addition, this course will cover the economic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies and the differences between short run (Keynesian) and long run (Classical) macroeconomic aspects of the economy. Particular attention will be given to integrating economic principles with the study of “real-world” problems.

Chapters
Unit 1: First Principles
Unit 2: Economic Models: Tradeoffs and Trade
Unit 3: Supply and Demand & The Market Strikes Back
Unit 4: Macroeconomics: The Big Picture & Tracking the Macroeconomy
Unit 5: Long-run Economic Growth & Savings, Investment, Spending, and the Financial System Unit 6: Aggregate Supply and Aggregate Demand
Unit 7: Fiscal Policy
Unit 8: Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve System & Monetary Policy
Unit 9: Labor Markets, Unemployment, and Inflation & Inflation, Disinflation, and Deflation Unit 10: Reflection

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7th Term March 21st, 2012

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MM207-02: Statistics
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(5 Credits)

Statistics - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Eric Thomas

Course Description
An introduction to collecting, organizing and summarizing, and analyzing data using statistical software. Topics include basic terminology, measurement, sampling procedures, graphical and numerical descriptions of data, basic probability, and making inferences from a sample to the population. Statistical software is provided in the course and extensive use of that software is required. The course focuses on thinking with statistics rather than calculating statistics.

Chapters
Ch. 0: Orientation Questions for Students
Ch. 1: Speaking of Statistics
Ch. 2: Measurement in Statistics
Ch. 3: Visual Displays of Data
Ch. 4: Describing Data
Ch. 5: A Normal World
Ch. 6: Probability in Statistics
Ch. 7: Correlation and Causality
Ch. 8: From Samples to Populations
Ch. 9: Hypothesis Testing
Ch. 10: t Tests, Two-Way Tables, and ANOVA
Ch. GR: Getting Ready for Statistics (Online Only)

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CM310: Communication & Conflict
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(6 Credits)

Communication and Conflict - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Will Hughes

Course Description
This course focuses on the nature of communication and conflict in interpersonal and organizational contexts. Students learn to apply theories of conflict and conflict resolution with an emphasis on ways to manage conflict in order to create more productive and satisfying interpersonal and professional relationships.

Chapters
Chapter 1 The Nature of Conflict 2
Chapter 2 Perspectives on Conflict 35
Chapter 3 Interests and Goals 70
Chapter 4 Power: The Structure of Conflict 103
Chapter 5 Styles and Tactics 144
Chapter 6 Emotions in Conflict 194
Chapter 7 Mapping Your Conflicts 218
Chapter 8 Interpersonal Negotiation 244
Chapter 9 Third-Party Intervention 271
Chapter 10 Forgiveness and Reconciliation 296

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6th Term January 4th, 2012

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SC300: Big Ideas in Science: From Methods to Mutation bar1
(6 Credits)

Science - click to go to amazon.com Science

Professor
Christin Morgan

Course Description
This unique course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important concepts in science, including inheritance, energy, randomness, and measurement. In addition, the class will give students a chance to explore the human aspects of science: how people put science into practice, how societies think about scientific findings, and why science depends on ethical practices. Knowledge gained in the course will help inform further study in many disciplines and will help students better understand how science affects their personal and professional lives.

Chapters
1. Science: A Way of Knowing: How do you know what you know?
2. The Ordered Universe: Why do planets appear to wander slowly across the sky?
3. Energy: Why must animals eat to stay alive?
4. Heat and the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Why is it easier to make an omelet from an egg than to make an egg from an omelet?
5. Electricity and Magnetism: What is lightning?
6. Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation: What is color?
7. Albert Einstein and the Theory of Relativity: Can a human ever travel faster than the speed of light, at “warp speed”?
8. The Atom: Why are there so many different materials in the world?
9. Quantum Mechanics: How can the electron behave like both a particle and a wave?
10. Atoms in Combination: The Chemical Bond: How does blood clot?
11. Materials and Their Properties: How have computers gotten so much faster?
12. The Nucleus of the Atom: How do scientists determine the age of the oldest human fossils?
13. The Ultimate Structure of Matter: How can antimatter be used to probe the human brain?
14. The Stars: How much longer can the Sun sustain life on Earth?
15. Cosmology: Will the universe end?
16. Earth and Other Planets: Is Earth the only planet with life?
17. Plate Tectonics: Can we predict destructive earthquakes?
18. Earth’s Many Cycles: Will we ever run out of fresh water?
19. Ecology, Ecosystems, and the Environment: Are human activities affecting the global environment?
20. Strategies of Life: What is life?
21. The Living Cell: What is the smallest living thing?
22. Molecules of Life: What constitutes a healthy diet?
23. Classical and Modern Genetics: Why do offspring resemble their parents?
24. The New Science of Life: Can we cure cancer?
25. Evolution: How did life emerge on the ancient Earth?

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5th Term October 19th, 2011

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SS310 Exploring the 1960’s – Interdisciplinary Approach bar1
(6 Credits)

1960s - click to go to amazon.com 1960s - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Nicole Braun/Tsiom Motkin

Course Description
This course will take an in-depth look at the 1960s as a significant era in American history. Adopting multiple perspectives, we will explore the societal impact of such issues as the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the Countercultural, Civil Rights and Feminist Movements, the advent of the birth control pill, and many others. Through exploring the music, political climate, and advancements in technology and medicine of this historical era, we will discover how our individual lives and society as a whole were forever changed.

Chapters
UNIT 1: Setting the Stage
UNIT 2: The Cold War and Vietnam
UNIT 3: The Camelot Years:
UNIT 4: The Civil Rights Movement
UNIT 5: The Counter Culture Movement
UNIT 6: Gender Movements
UNIT 7: Science and Technology
UNIT 8: The Face of Government
UNIT 9: Loss of Leaders
UNIT 10: Wrap Up

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4th Term August 3rd, 2011

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HU300 Art & Humanities
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(6 Credits)

Humanities - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Gabriel Jewell/Penelope Orr

Course Description The root of humanities is the study of what it means to be human. In this course, we will talk specifically about types of creative expression and the ways we have interpreted this in the twentieth century and beyond. While the origin of the word humanities may be ancient, the term has everything to do with our own lives. Has anyone told you to stop and smell the roses? The appreciation and awareness of being human is the heart of the humanities, and includes literature, art, music, philosophy, film, and popular culture. So, the next time you are reading a fairy tale to a child, noticing a graffiti-covered wall on your way to work, or even reasoning out what the right thing to do might be, you’re actively engaging in the humanities. A study of the humanities can yield direct benefits to your daily life, such as offering a new perspective to develop your understanding, and sparking creative energy that can be a benefit in your career, community, and daily life. In our first unit, well be focusing on understanding the humanities through critical thinking.

Chapters
01. The Humanities: Still Vital
02. Profile of the Critical Thinker
03. Myth and the Origin of the Humanities
04. Literature
05. Art
06. Music
07. Theater
08. The Musical Stage: Opera, Music Drama, Dance
09. Cinema
10. Religion
11. Morality
12. Happiness
13. Love
14. Death and Life-Affirmation
15. Controversial Themes and the Humanities
16. Freedom

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3rd Term May 18th, 2011

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HU345 Critical Thinking
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Critical Thinking - click to go to amazon.com

Professor
Ronald Davenport

Course Description
This course helps students apply tools of informal logic and critical thinking to practical situations they encounter in everyday life. Students will learn how to use methods of critical thinking to evaluate arguments, claims, and strategies for constructing sound arguments. They will also learn how to identify and respond to faulty or manipulative reasoning in their own thinking and arguments and in the thinking and arguments of others. In addition, students will assess the reasoning found in mass media (such as websites, advertisements, and newspapers). Finally, students will apply the concepts they study to real-world issues of personal and professional significance.

Chapters
CHAPTER 01 Communication and Persuasion: Logos, Pathos, Ethos
CHAPTER 02 Arguments and Controversies
CHAPTER 03 Strategies of Argumentation
CHAPTER 04 Problems in Reasoning
CHAPTER 05 Visual Arguments
CHAPTER 06 Critical Thinking about Poetry, Fiction, and Literary Nonfiction
CHAPTER 07 Library Strategies
CHAPTER 08 Evaluating Evidence
CHAPTER 09 Documentation
CHAPTER 10 Writing Your Research Paper
A CONCISE HANDBOOK ON GRAMMAR, MECHANICS, AND USAGE

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2nd Term March 2nd, 2011
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HU245-04: Ethics
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(5 Credits)

Ethics - click to go to amazon.com Ethics

Professor
Jerett Vincent

Course Description
In this course, students develop sound ethical reasoning and judgment through the study of practical applications of ethical theories. Topics studied include ethics as it relates to business, health care, society, and the environment. Emphasis is on practical applications of ethical principles and analytical methods.

Chapters
Chapter 1. The Nature of Morality, 1
Chapter 2. Consequentialist (Teleological) Theories of Morality, 34
Chapter 3. Nonconsequentialist (Deontological) Theories of Morality, 53
Chapter 4. Virtue Ethics, 70 Chapter 5. Absolutism Versus Relativism, 88
Chapter 6. Freedom Versus Determinism, 103
Chapter 7. Reward and Punishment, 120
Chapter 8. Setting Up a Moral System: Basic Assumptions and Basic Principles, 156
Chapter 9. The Taking of Human Life, 181
Chapter 10. Allowing Someone to Die, Mercy Death, and Mercy Killing, 207
Chapter 11. Abortion, 253
Chapter 12. Lying, Cheating, Breaking Promises, and Stealing, 275
Chapter 13. Morality, Marriage, and Human Sexuality, 304
Chapter 14. Bioethics Ethical Issues in Medicine, 332
Chapter 15. Business and Media Ethics, 361 Chapter 16. Environmental Ethics, 394

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1st Term December 8th, 2010
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CS123: College Success Strategy for Prof. and Liberal Studies Prof. bar1
(5 Credits)

college success college success

Professor
Abigail Nhwako

Course Description
Designed to facilitate personal and professional success, this course introduces students to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation.

Target Audience
All

Recommended Background
None.

Prerequisites
None.

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SC115: Principles of Nutrition
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(5 Credits)

Nutrition - click to go to amazon.com

Professor Stacie Kisver see ratings

Course Description
This is an introductory level course in which students investigate the fundamental concepts of nutrition: food sources; nutrient function; digestion; absorption; and metabolism. Special attention is given to learning to apply nutritional principles to food choices in a way that encourages a health lifestyle. Students will learn how nutritional needs change from infancy through adulthood, including pregnancy and the senior stages of life.This is an introductory level course in which students investigate the fundamental concepts of nutrition: food sources; nutrient function; digestion; absorption; and metabolism. Special attention is given to learning to apply nutritional principles to food choices in a way that encourages a health lifestyle. Students will learn how nutritional needs change from infancy through adulthood, including pregnancy and the senior stages of life.

Course Objective
By the end of this course, you should be able to: Describe the role of nutrition in a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Explain how nutrients are processed and used in the human body. Apply nutritional principles to food choices. Evaluate nutritional needs at various stages of the life cycle.

Chapters
1. The Role of Nutrition in Our Health
2. Designing a Healthful Diet
3. The Human Body: Are We Really What We Eat?
4. Carbohydrates: Plant-Derived Energy Nutrients In Depth: Alcohol
5. Fat: An Essential Energy-Supplying Nutrient
6. Proteins: Crucial Components of All Body Tissues In Depth: Vitamins and Minerals: Micronutrients with Macro Powers
7. Nutrients Involved in Fluid and Electrolyte Balance
8. Nutrients Involved in Antioxidant Function In Depth: Phytochemicals and Functional Foods
9. Nutrients Involved in Bone Health
10. Nutrients Involved in Energy Metabolism and Blood Health
11. Achieving and Maintaining a Healthful Body Weight
12. Nutrition and Physical Activity: Keys to Good Health
13. Disordered Eating
14. Food Safety: Impact on Consumers
15. Nutrition Through the Lifecycle: Pregnancy and the First Year of Life
16. Nutrition Through the Lifecycle: Childhood to Late Adulthood In Depth: Global Nutrition

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Thammasat University
Data Communications ITS323 30 lectures

Yale University
Philosophy Death: PHIL 176
Listening to Music: MUSI 112
Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature: PHIL 181
Political Philosophy: PLSC 114

University of Edinburgh
Introduction to Philosophy

Other

Stanford University Introduction to Artificial Intelligence – in class –
My Notes: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Artificial Intelligence course from Hochschule Ravensburg-Weingarten – in lecture –
My Notes: to be added